........................................................................................ - a weBlog by Snowy and me.

Sunday, 6 January 2019

This Blog Is Taking A Long Rest

Please enjoy the music,
because echo is to sound 
what shadow is to light;
a gentle confirmation of friendship.  

Saturday, 5 January 2019

When Technology Advances

so deep into human life that we lose all sense
of time, order and the power of ritual and routine
where does this power go? Surely into addictions
where what we do and say is dictated by needs
set beyond our means of stopping ourselves.... 

Friday, 4 January 2019

Note To Self

The fears can-and will-feed themselves, without any assistance from me.

Thursday, 3 January 2019

Competitive Indifference

Before Charles Darwin redefined competitiveness
as drawn by the examples he found in nature
and lengthened the age of the earth by millions of years
Adam Smith set the human rate for short term indifference
between people, with his ideas of Markets.

To Smith markets were not merely mechanisms
for the exchange of goods,where human labour
autonomously modified itself according to the value
a factory owner put on it so he may remain in profit.

To Adam Smith everything except God, Royalty and Parliament
was fit for barter in the universal market
where everything was human and of relative value,
the better to be easily bought and sold.

In this new market place, led by empire,
the wealth of the rich was derived
from a semi-divine right of wealth
derived from favours from the court
of still nearly absolute kingship.

Beneath the rich were the worthy poor
who served the rich and lived in debt
because part of the wealth of the rich
was in the debts they left unpaid to their tradesmen.

Beneath the worthy poor were the unworthy poor,
expelled from the land that no longer supported them
they were used up as labour in factories
that treated them worse that slaves
when slavery was still legal, all because
the ultimate in market values
was about extending the choice in human misery. 

Wednesday, 2 January 2019

Extreme Feminist Thought For 2019

I would happily contrast the impossible to account for
10,000 year history of militarism and sexual violence by men,
much of which is rhetorically counted as heroic, against the modern,
more voluntary, deaths of 'the unborn' as done by women
in the name of female autonomy in a vibrant peace time economy.

In so far as the numbers of the never-to-be-born
might compare with the collected deaths from battles
nothing women did could compare with how well rape works
as a systematic weapon of war, when it punishes
the weakest gender of the losing side.

As retributions go it triples the absoluteness of the victors.

Rape disable's the losing side's capacity for nurture,
destroys the losing side's human biology
and destroys the loser's culture,
which ends up un-empathic
and beyond being compromised.

Life should be about much more than violence
or orchestrated triumphs against otherness,
as done by drugged up and rootless armies,
as they attempt to spread death more evenly
around a planet already in an infinite amount of pain.

No babies or women were hurt in writing this blog.

Tuesday, 1 January 2019

Picture Set Of The Month

People often say 'Nature says nothing to me'  
as if saying nothing was a bad thing
and having something to say was important
but I can live with saying less, I have been trying
 and failing to say less quite well for longer than I care to think. 

Monday, 31 December 2018

Somebody Else's Carelessness

Or the story of  'The Irishman and His Donkey'.....

Where I grew up, the English were very English indeed,
they thought they always had the best,
and they were the best at everything.

What they were particularly good at was telling lies
about other countries to comfort themselves
about how much better their lives were
then everyone else's in the world.

Often they were sly about it too,
they talked about it highly indirectly
-through the metaphor of animal husbandry.

They often talked about 'The Irishman and his donkey',
and how when one day the man had no feed for the beast
he made it accept no food that day, as if it was of no matter.
And how often the poor Irishman repeated this pattern
and lived within his means until his beast of burden
could carry no more, in this life at least, it died of starvation.

This was the English way of explaining to themselves
the effects of the potato famine of the 1840's,
where selectively across Europe crops failed,
and explaining why the Irish population who survived
left for America-it was all there was left for them to do.

This was also the English way of explaining to themselves,
without ever appearing to admit it, that if you have an empire
and mismanage it well enough that it's population starves
then you will lose your empire in the end, but by then
the story has to be about somebody else's carelessness.